Young and healthy may see premiums rise 17 percent under Obamacare 

Or so says a new study from Rand:

Health insurance premiums for young adults are expected to rise about 17 percent once they’re required to buy insurance four years from now. That estimate is from an analysis by Rand Health.

Young people will need to carry more of the burden of health care under the new health overhaul law. The new law limits an industry practice of charging older customers more.

Not that this is much of surprise. Back in November, Robert Samuelson warned that the legislation would turn into an intergenerational Ponzi scheme:

Now comes the House-passed health-care “reform” bill that, amazingly, would extract more subsidies from the young. It mandates that health insurance premiums for older Americans be no more than twice the level of that for younger Americans. That’s much less than the actual health spending gap between young and old. Spending for those age 60 to 64 is four to five times greater than those 18 to 24. So, the young would overpay for insurance that — under the House bill — people must buy: Twenty- and thirtysomethings would subsidize premiums for fifty-and sixtysomethings. (Those 65 and over receive Medicare.)

What could go wrong? Young people already foot the bill for Social Security and Medicare and that’s working out fine, right?

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Mark Hemingway

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