Why Republican lobbyists work so hard for a Republican majority 

Lobbyists are more likely than any other class of professional, I imagine, to contribute to congressional campaigns. Part of this, I’m sure, is an effort to win the attention of lawmakers, thus increase your chances of getting your calls returned.

But another reason lobbyists spend so much to elect their guys — if your ex-boss moves into the majority, and maybe gets a subcommittee, your value as a lobbyist goes up. And so does your pay.

Politico’s Chris Frates has a good piece today on the newly richer Republicans:

“My Republican friends are walking around with big smiles on their faces,” said Democratic operative David DiMartino.

And no wonder: The money’s good.

When Democrats took control of Congress in 2006, their operatives cashed in. For instance, Steve Elmendorf launched his Democratic firm in December 2006 with $170,000 worth of business. Last year, the former aide to then-House Democratic leader Dick Gephardt brought in almost $7.4 million, according to the Center for Responsive Politics.

Now, it’s the Republicans’ turn.

After four years in political exile, GOP operatives with ties to presumptive House Speaker John Boehner, soon-to-be Majority Leader Eric Cantor and other top Republicans will help set the agenda on health care, tax cuts and government spending.

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Timothy P. Carney

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