Two high-profile criminal cases, one jury so far 

click to enlarge News coverage of Ross Mirkarimi has been extensive, but perhaps not as extensive as that of the Edwin Ramos case. - SF EXAMINER FILE PHOTO
  • SF Examiner file photo
  • News coverage of Ross Mirkarimi has been extensive, but perhaps not as extensive as that of the Edwin Ramos case.

As Sheriff Ross Mirkarimi’s attorneys seek to move his domestic violence trial out of The City, claiming that prospective jurors are biased due to negative publicity, another local jury is already weighing a high-profile case that perhaps received more news coverage.

A pool of about 1,000 potential jurors were called in the triple-murder trial of Edwin Ramos, according to Assistant District Attorney Harry Dorfman, who is prosecuting Ramos for the June 22, 2008 shootings of a father and two of his sons.

Ramos’ case gripped The City for months after the slayings, which police call a mistaken-identity attack by members of the MS-13 gang. Even the national media took interest, because of allegations that Ramos was sheltered from deportation by The City’s sanctuary ordinance after arrests as a juvenile.



Most jurors were dismissed because of the economic hardship posed by a trial expected to last five months. But after only three days of questioning about whether the remaining pool of about 140 could be fair in the case, 12 jurors and eight alternates were picked.

Ramos’ attorneys made rumblings about seeking a change of venue prior to jury selection, but that never panned out.

Mirkarimi’s defense has cited “inflammatory and editorial” news coverage since a police investigation into an alleged incident in which Mirkarimi’s wife’s arm was bruised became public in January. He’s now facing misdemeanor charges.

By Thursday, about 450 potential jurors had been called in his trial, and a pool of about 175 remained. Jury selection continues today.

aburack@sfexaminer.com

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