Too cold in Peru? Blame global warming. 

This article in The Guardian serves as just one more piece of proof that proponents of Anthropogenic Global Warming will take any weather phenomenon whatsoever and explain it in terms of Global Warming -- including the cold. Mountain dwellers in Peru are now endangered by ever-colder temperatures, and "climate change" is blamed:

In a world growing ever hotter, Huancavelica is an anomaly. These communities, living at the edge of what is possible, face extinction because of increasingly cold conditions in their own microclimate, which may have been altered by the rapid melting of the glaciers.

It really looks like someone just tacked a Global Warming lede onto an unrelated article. No serious attempt is made in the article to explain the connection. (And no, the world has not been growing hotter since at least 1998.) In any case, the hyperbole continues:

Climate change campaigners and development NGOs say that the failure of Copenhagen has signed the death warrant for hundreds of thousands of the world's poorest and that a quarter of a million children will die before world leaders meet again to try to thrash out another deal at the United Nations next climate change conference in Mexico in December. Among them may be these children of the high mountains.

Simply assume the accuracy of the old carbon consensus, whose foundational data have been recently called into question. The writer of this article, or at least the "campaigners" cited, seem to be implying that there's a switch somewhere that can just change the temperature and carbon level in a matter of months or years. That's totally unrealistic. The effects of any Copenhagen agreement on carbon would not have been felt for many, many years, perhaps decades. (Although its destruction of American jobs would have been felt immediately.) The effects of any such agreement on temperature, if any, would have been even further delayed.

In a world growing ever hotter, Huancavelica is annomaly. These communities, living at the edge of what is possible, face extinction because of increasingly cold conditions in their own microclimate, which may have been altered by the rapid melting of the glaciers.


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David Freddoso

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David Freddoso came to the Washington Examiner in June 2009, after serving for nearly two years as a Capitol Hill-based staff reporter for National Review Online. Before writing his New York Times bestselling book, The Case Against Barack Obama, he spent three years assisting Robert Novak, the legendary Washington... more
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