Stimulus map update: On pace to 'create or save' 3.5 BILLION jobs? 

The Fannie Taylor Home for the Aged in Jacksonville, Fla. got a lot of bang for its stimulus buck. It reported creating 127 jobs with its low-income housing grant. Just one problem: The grant was worth less than $28,000, so that each job supposedly "created or saved" cost less than $220.

A spokeswoman for the Fannie Taylor home did not respond to The Examiner's request for comment. But the organization's report to Recovery.gov provides a laundry list of more than 30 examples of jobs ("...beautician, bus driver, certified nursing assistant, certified occupancy specialist, cook, physical therapist...") and concludes that "receipt of Recovery Act funds allowed these types of jobs to remain substantially in tact (sic)."

If $217.55 is enough to save a job, then there's no reason for the White House to worry about meeting its goal of creating or saving 3.5 million jobs. They're on pace to create 3.5 billion jobs.

In addition to this and other clearly impossible claims of job creation and salvation on Recovery.gov, The Examiner has focused on the nation's Head Start programs, which routinely misstated the number of jobs created or saved. In many cases, Head Start programs reported large job numbers, but then noted under the description section of their report that they actually used their grants to provide raises to existing employees and to purchase equipment. Some of the Head Start programs reporting large jobs numbers even noted explicitly in other sections of their report that no jobs had been saved or created with their grant.

The new additions to our Jobs Not Really Created or Saved Stimulus Map come to about 2,000. They bring our total so far to more than 92,500 stimulus jobs not really created or saved, or 14.5 percent of the total claimed by the Obama administration.

 


View Bogus jobs 'created or saved' by the Stimulus in a larger map

About The Author

David Freddoso

Bio:
David Freddoso came to the Washington Examiner in June 2009, after serving for nearly two years as a Capitol Hill-based staff reporter for National Review Online. Before writing his New York Times bestselling book, The Case Against Barack Obama, he spent three years assisting Robert Novak, the legendary Washington... more
Pin It
Favorite

More by David Freddoso

Latest in Nation

© 2018 The San Francisco Examiner

Website powered by Foundation