SFPD moves most of operations into new headquarters 

click to enlarge San Francisco's new Public Safety Building which will house San Francisco Police Department headquarters, Southern District Police Station, Fire Station No.4, and the Arson Task Force will be up and running on April 13, 2015. Police Chief Greg Suhr enters the new Public Safety Building on Third Street. - GABRIELLE LURIE/SPECIAL TO THE EXAMINER
  • Gabrielle Lurie/Special to The Examiner
  • San Francisco's new Public Safety Building which will house San Francisco Police Department headquarters, Southern District Police Station, Fire Station No.4, and the Arson Task Force will be up and running on April 13, 2015. Police Chief Greg Suhr enters the new Public Safety Building on Third Street.
Like much of the rising Mission Bay, the new police headquarters looks and feels like a very modern building — and not much like it’s actually in The City.

The building it replaced — the Hall of Justice at 850 Bryant St. — is anything but modern and is different as a building can be from its replacement.

The more than five-decade-old building has been plagued with a plethora of issues, from asbestos issues to structural weakness, and may not withstand a big trembler.

“It’s everything the other building isn’t,” Police Chief Greg Suhr said last week as media and public officials toured the new six-story building at Third and Mission Rock streets.

The $243 million structure became home to the entire department Saturday. The location also became the new Southern Police Station (the station house is attached to the main headquarters).

The structure, paid for with a voter-approved bond, broke ground in 2011. The building also includes a fire station and a restored fire station. The building will house 250 police employees and has been designed to operate for 96 employees off the grid, if a disaster occurs. The facility meets the LEED Gold rating for sustainability and has energy-saving solar panels with a graywater-rainwater reuse collection system for irrigation, plus several green roofs.

The building, which is a secure and built to prevent much of the easy public access that was the norm at the Hall of Justice, has several public-art elements and a news conference room — but not press offices, as the old building contained.

jlamb@sfexaminer.com

About The Author

Jonah Owen Lamb

Jonah Owen Lamb

Bio:
Born and raised on a houseboat in Sausalito, Lamb has written for newspapers in New York City, Utah and the San Joaquin Valley. He was most recently an editor at the San Luis Obispo Tribune for nearly three years. He has written for The S.F. Examiner since 2013 and covers criminal justice and planning.
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