S.F. International Film Festival select programs 

click to enlarge Festival films of local interest include "Romeo Is Bleeding," which follows a poet who works with teens in Richmond to adapt Shakespeare’s "Romeo and Juliet" to their own, violent, modern-day setting. - COURTESY  PHOTO
  • COURTESY PHOTO
  • Festival films of local interest include "Romeo Is Bleeding," which follows a poet who works with teens in Richmond to adapt Shakespeare’s "Romeo and Juliet" to their own, violent, modern-day setting.
Here’s a brief sampling of the hundreds of films and programs offered during the 15-day event.

AWARDS

Director Guillermo del Toro, with screening of “The Devil's Backbone.” (8 p.m. April 25, Castro)

Actor Richard Gere, with screening of “Time Out of Mind.” (6:30 p.m. April 26, Castro)

Screenwriter Paul Schrader, with screening of “Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters.” (6:30 p.m. April 28, Kabuki)

Documentarian Kim Longinotto, with screening of “Dreamcatcher.” (3 p.m. May 2, Kabuki)

Exhibitor Lenny Borger, with screening of “Monte-Cristo.” (1 p.m. May 3, Kabuki)

BIG NIGHTS

Centerpiece: “The End of the Tour” dramatizes five days of stimulating dialogue that occurred between journalist David Lipsky and author David Foster Wallace during Wallace’s publicity tour. Jason Segel portrays Wallace. (6:45 p.m. May 2, Kabuki )

Closing: “Experimenter” tells the story of scientist Stanley Milgram and his famed experiment demonstrating what can happen when people are “just following orders.” Peter Sarsgaard stars. (7 p.m. May 7, Castro)

GUEST SPEAKERS

David Thomson: The film critic and author of “Why Acting Matters” introduces “Listen to Me Marlon,” Stevan Riley’s documentary about Marlon Brando, and sign copies of his book. (3:45 p.m. April 25, Kabuki)

Black Panthers: Stanley Nelson’s documentary “The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution” screens, followed by a talk with the filmmakers and members of the Black Panther Party. (3 p.m. April 25, Kabuki)

LOCAL INTEREST

Romeo Is Bleeding: Jason Zeldes’ documentary captures poet Donte Clark’s effort to help a violence-ravaged community by working with Richmond teens on an adaptation of “Romeo and Juliet.” (7:30 p.m. April 29 at El Cerrito High School, 6:30 p.m. May 1, Kabuki)

The Royal Road: Experimental S.F. director Jenni Olson explores the terrain of history and memory in a personal essay with voiceover narration and long takes of urban landscapes. (6:15 p.m. April 29 and 8:45 p.m. April 30, Kabuki)

Very Semi-Serious: Bay Area filmmaker Leah Wolchok takes audiences into the world of New Yorker cartoons in this documentary featuring interviews with contributors to the magazine. (6:30 p.m. May 1 and May 5, Clay; 4:15 p.m. May 3, Pacific Film Archive)

STATE OF CINEMA

Douglas Trumbull: The visual-effects pioneer, whose credits include Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey,” shares his views on the present and future of cinema. (6:30 p.m. May 3, Kabuki)

WORLD CINEMA

Black Coal, Thin Ice: A ex-cop is haunted by a serial-killer case in this whodunit and character study from Chinese filmmaker Diao Yinan. (6 p.m. April 27, Clay; 9:15 p.m. April 29, Kabuki)

The Dark Horse: Searching for purpose, a former chess champion with bipolar disorder volunteers at a chess club for underserved kids in this drama from New Zealand, directed by James Napier Robertson. (3 p.m. April 25, Clay; 6:45 p.m. April 27, Kabuki)

The Wonders: Director Alice Rohrwacher examines rural Italian life in this Cannes Grand Prix-winning drama. (8:45 p.m. April 25, Clay; 1 p.m. April 26, Kabuki)

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Anita Katz

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