SF announces nearly $700M for public schools, children’s programs 

click to enlarge The City plans to allocate $140 million to the San Francisco Unified School District over the next two years as part of Mayor Ed Lee's proposed budget. - MIKE KOOZMIN/S.F. EXAMINER 2014 FILE PHOTO
  • Mike Koozmin/S.F. Examiner 2014 File Photo
  • The City plans to allocate $140 million to the San Francisco Unified School District over the next two years as part of Mayor Ed Lee's proposed budget.

The San Francisco Unified School District is poised to receive a substantial bump in funding from The City over the next two years as part of Mayor Ed Lee’s proposed budget.

The City plans to allocate $140 million for the district’s 2015-16 and 2016-17 fiscal year budgets, of which $68.9 million will go toward the fiscal year that starts July 1. That money marks a 17 percent increase from The City’s contribution last fiscal year.

Lee announced the additional funding at the Tenderloin Community School on Thursday. The money is part of an overall $690.4 million that will be committed in Lee’s budget for children’s programs, made possible by the passage of Proposition C in November.

“In these times of economic prosperity, we're going to share that with our school district,” Lee said. “That's where the talent is growing.”

Lee added, “Ultimately every successful industry in The City, whether it’s healthcare, tourism, hospitality or technology, or now the growing industry of local manufacturing, they’re going to all find that talent right here in our public school district.”

Also included in The City’s investment is another 860 slots in public preschools, and $4.3 million to eliminate the waitlists for summer and afterschool programs, Lee said.

Some $34.5 million will also go toward the SFUSD’s rainy day reserve. Another $513.9 million will go to various services for children over the next two years, including the Department of Youth, Children and Their Families’ Children’s Fund revenue, and money for for youths up to 24 years old who need support entering the workforce.

The creation of the Our City, Our Families Council will serve as an advisory committee of community members to increase data-sharing among city agencies and leverage resources for the school district.

Superintendent Richard Carranza said the district is grateful for the increased funding, which adds to the anticipated boost from Gov. Jerry Brown’s revised state budget. “The budget that we take to the Board of Education [in June] is going to be reflective of some higher numbers,” Carranza said Thursday.

About The Author

Laura Dudnick

Bio:
Laura Dudnick, a Bay Area native, covers education and planning for The San Francisco Examiner. She previously worked as a senior local editor for Patch.com, and as the San Mateo County bureau reporter and weekend editor for Bay City News Service.
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