San Francisco labor leaders unite against mayoral candidates Jeff Adachi, John Avalos 

click to enlarge Public Defender Jeff Adachi says the fact that unions are spending money to oppose his mayoral campaign shows they can afford to contribute more to pensions. (Examiner file photo) - PUBLIC DEFENDER JEFF ADACHI SAYS THE FACT THAT UNIONS ARE SPENDING MONEY TO OPPOSE HIS MAYORAL CAMPAIGN SHOWS THEY CAN AFFORD TO CONTRIBUTE MORE TO PENSIONS. (EXAMINER FILE PHOTO)
  • Public Defender Jeff Adachi says the fact that unions are spending money to oppose his mayoral campaign shows they can afford to contribute more to pensions. (Examiner file photo)
  • Public Defender Jeff Adachi says the fact that unions are spending money to oppose his mayoral campaign shows they can afford to contribute more to pensions. (Examiner file photo)

Police, fire and building trade-labor leaders have joined forces to create a political group to explicitly oppose two leading mayoral candidates.

Public Defender Jeff Adachi and Supervisor John Avalos have the distinct honor of being the target of the newly formed independent expenditure committee, which has no contribution and spending limits.

Police Officers Association President Gary Delagnes, fire labor union head Tom O’Connor and plumbers union head Larry Mazzola Sr. formed the political committee on Friday. Dubbed Educating Voters for Jobs: Against Avalos and Adachi for Mayor 2011, the coalition says it is targeting anti-worker candidates.

“That’s great to hear,” Avalos said. “Obviously, they feel threatened by me. I’m on the rise.”

Avalos angered some building-trade leaders with his local-hiring law, which requires labor to hire a certain number of San Francisco residents for public construction jobs. Adachi is considered public enemy No. 1 by labor leaders for his November pension measure that would force city workers to pay more into their pensions than would a dueling measure crafted by Mayor Ed Lee and labor leaders.

“They are clearly threatened by anything that changes the status quo,” Adachi said. “They seem to have plenty of money to burn. It shows they can contribute more toward their pensions.”

Unlike candidates, third-party independent expenditure committees can receive contributions of unlimited amounts and spend as much as they want.

Mazzola, head of the Plumbers and Pipe Fitters Local Union 38, recently broke from one third-party group, Alliance on Jobs, after it invited Adachi to its sponsored mayoral debate. Last November, Alliance for Jobs spent a combined $595,860 in three supervisor races backing the more moderate candidates.

Michael Theriault, secretary-treasurer for the San Francisco Building and Construction Trades Council, said Avalos was singled out for what he called his “pretty sad” record on job creation.

jsabatini@sfexaminer.com

 

A spending party

Four third-party political groups have formed recently in an effort to influence the mayoral race, which will be decided on Nov. 8. Third-party groups have few limitations on fundraising, unlike candidates, and can be formed for or against a candidate or issue.

THIRD-PARTY GROUP PURPOSE
Committee for Effective City Management Various people in support of Lee
San Franciscans for Jobs and Good Government Techies, investors supporting Lee
City Residents Supporting Leland Yee for Mayor 2011 Unions for Yee
Educating Voters for Jobs AgainstAvalos and Adachi for Mayor 2011 Unions against Adachi and Avalos

Source: Ethics Commission

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