Review: ‘WALL-E’ is Pixar perfect 

What a wonderful world

"WALL-E" imagines. That might seem odd to say about a movie that is set, at least initially, on the post-apocalyptic compost heap Earth has become after centuries of misuse.

But amid the trash that looms like gloomy monuments to man’s careless legacy, there is hope. That’s where WALL-E comes in.

WALL-E is the last functioning robot on earth, dutifully crunching garbage into tidy cubes. Nobody’s around to appreciate his work — the planet, now thought to be infertile, has been abandoned for years — but what’s a ’bot to do?

The answer is more complicated than one might imagine.

WALL-E has developed a soul behind those melancholy eyes he uses to spot tidbits in the rubble (a Rubik’s cube, a paddle ball) and watch reruns of his favorite musical, "Hello, Dolly!" So it comes as little surprise that he falls for EVE, a sleek scout ’bot with electric-blue eyes, deployed to Earth to find signs of life.

As it happens, one exists, and not just in the heart of our pint-size hero. During his daily routine, WALL-E stumbles upon a growing plant and, after a quizzical stare, scoops it up. EVE, recognizing the bigger picture, snatches it away.

Vegetation is exactly what the human race — relegated to the Axiom, a flying resort in the far reaches of space — has been waiting for to signal that the time is right for a homecoming, and it’s EVE’s job to deliver the good news.

It’s not easy, given the presence of a malevolent mainframe aboard the Axiom (think HAL from "2001: A Space Odyssey") who has deemed Earth unfit for human habitation.

But WALL-E, desperate to impress the femme ’bot he romanticizes, hitches a ride into space and plots to save the day.

Director Andrew Stanton ("Finding Nemo") has described "WALL-E" as his attempt to make an R2-D2 movie, but there is an irrepressible humanity in his storytelling that George Lucas should envy. While one might be thrown at first by his approach — the film has little dialogue in the first hour, just beeps, bangs and garbled robot-speak — his ballad of a lonely ’bot is utterly engrossing.

It’s also a sign of how far animation has come. "WALL-E" isn’t quite like anything you’ve ever seen before — its lovingly detailed universe recalls the visual grandeur of "2001," "Blade Runner" and "Tron" — but its backdrops are breathtaking in their realism.

WALL-E, in all his innocence, is perhaps the film’s greatest achievement, a robot whose glassy eyes and tiny, sometimes heartbroken voice convey as much emotion as any man’s could.

There is real poignancy in his story, both a space-age adventure and a classic romance. Each is compelling. The result is a wondrous work of the imagination and, to date, the year’s best film.

CREDITS

WALL-E (4 stars)

Starring Voices of Ben Burtt, Elissa Knight, Jeff Garlin, Fred Willard, John Ratzenberger

Written and directed by Andrew Stanton

Rated G

Running time 1 hour 37 minutes

About The Author

Staff Report

Staff Report

Bio:
A daily newspaper covering San Francisco, San Mateo County and serving Alameda, Marin and Santa Clara counties.
Pin It
Favorite

Speaking of Entertainment, Scoop!

More by Staff Report

Latest in Gossip

© 2018 The San Francisco Examiner

Website powered by Foundation