Redevelopment of San Francisco's Hunters Point clears court hurdle 

click to enlarge Green light: A lawsuit filed by two groups stemmed from the former Hunters Point naval facility’s designation as a Superfund toxic site. (AP file photo)
  • Green light: A lawsuit filed by two groups stemmed from the former Hunters Point naval facility’s designation as a Superfund toxic site. (AP file photo)

San Francisco can go forward with the redevelopment of the Hunters Point Shipyard after a San Francisco Superior Court judge ruled in favor of The City in an environmental lawsuit.

Judge Ernest Goldsmith found that the report complied with California law. However, he said that if The City authorizes an early transfer of any property on the site from the Navy to the developer, further environmental review would be required. That leaves the Navy in charge of cleanup.

The development has been held up by a series of lawsuits stemming from the former Navy facility’s designation as a highly toxic Superfund site by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

This lawsuit against developer Lennar Urban was the last to be decided. It was brought by two community groups, People Organized to Win Employment Rights and Greenaction for Health and Environmental Justice, which challenged the project’s environmental impact report.

The Hunters Point plan, which would include housing, parks and retail, along with a potential new stadium for the 49ers, has been in the works for more than seven years.

Mayor Ed Lee cheered the ruling, which followed a tentative decision two months ago.

"The court saw clearly that environmental safeguards and laws were adhered to on a major development project," he said. "Even as we strive to lift the Bayview from decades of neglect, The City never took a shortcut to ensure the health, safety and success of this important revitalization effort."

Marie Harrison, Greenaction’s organizer for the Bayview, said the ruling is a victory for both sides.

"We didn’t get everything that we wanted, but most things we got," she said. "Contrary to what everybody is saying, it has never been about not building over the shipyard. Our job was to monitor the environmental conditions for our community."

acrawford@sfexaminer.com

About The Author

Amy Crawford

Pin It
Favorite

© 2018 The San Francisco Examiner

Website powered by Foundation