Owners shoot down most replay proposals 

click to enlarge NFL referee Walt Coleman, center, enters the Instant Replay sideline booth to review a play during the NFL football game between the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Houston Texans in Pittsburgh. NFL owners shot down nearly every video replay proposal brought to their meetings Tuesday, March 24, 2015, while approving several safety rules enhancements. - GENE J. PUSKAR/AP FILE PHOTO
  • Gene J. Puskar/AP File Photo
  • NFL referee Walt Coleman, center, enters the Instant Replay sideline booth to review a play during the NFL football game between the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Houston Texans in Pittsburgh. NFL owners shot down nearly every video replay proposal brought to their meetings Tuesday, March 24, 2015, while approving several safety rules enhancements.
PHOENIX — NFL owners shot down nearly every video replay proposal brought to their meetings Tuesday, while approving six safety rule changes.

Of the 13 replay alterations proposed, including extending the number of coaches' challenges and letting them challenge all officiating calls, the only one passed will allow game officials to use replay for clock issues at the end of a half, game or overtime if more than 1 second remains.

Washington's suggestion to use replay to review personal fouls was withdrawn. Kansas City withdrew a proposal to allow replay officials to review all potential scores or turnovers. For example, a pass ruled incomplete in the end zone could be reviewed by the replay official without a coach's challenge. Currently, the play would be reviewed only if it was ruled a touchdown.

Proposals defeated were:

—increasing coaches' challenges by one to three;

—replay reviews of any personal fouls;

—reviews of any penalty resulting in a first down, with no challenge necessary;

—replays on fouls against a defenseless receiver being enforced when a reversal results in an incomplete pass;

—reviewing fouls against a defenseless receiver, with an unsuccessful challenge not costing a timeout;

—reviewing whether time expired on the play clock before the ball is snapped;

—using stadium-produced video for a replay review.

Philadelphia Eagles owner Jeffrey Lurie was disappointed the Patriots' proposal that virtually anything be challengeable was not passed.

"We sort of have an encyclopedic notebook of what you can challenge," Lurie said. "I prefer challenge anything. It didn't pass and I hope someday it will."

The owners approved a proposal for stopping play when a medical adviser believes a player is unstable and should be taken off the field. They also approved rules prohibiting players from pushing teammates on the line of scrimmage when the opponent is punting; eliminating all peel-back blocks and chop blocks by running backs outside the tackle box; and extending defenseless player protection during an interception return.

Tabled was a move to place cameras on all boundary lines (sidelines, goal lines and end lines) while the league further researches such a project.

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