Now that the CBO is saying it, is it still ‘barely true?’ 

So, the stimulus did cost more than the Iraq War. So says the Congressional Budget Office.

When our own Mark Tapscott posted that information, it was grudgingly acknowledged by Politifact as “Barely True.” Now we have the CBO saying the exact same thing.

According to CBO numbers in its Budget and Economic Outlook published this month, the cost of Operation Iraqi Freedom was $709 billion for military and related activities, including training of Iraqi forces and diplomatic operations.

The projected cost of the stimulus, which passed in February 2009, and is expected to have a shelf life of two years, was $862 billion.

(For the record, I believe there is an error here — the stimulus cost was recently revised downward to $814 billion.)

The irony is that we have so many people — not just politicians and liberal journalists, but even the normally reliable FactCheck.org — misrepresenting CBO’s reports on the stimulus, as though they prove its success. (CBO has never studied the issue of whether economic conditions improved after or because of the stimulus. They have merely released estimates of job creation based on levels of stimulus spending and assumptions they made before the stimulus passed.)

But in this case, we have a cut-and-dry numbers question for CBO of which one costs more, and the answer is: The stimulus.

So can I get a “Mostly True?” An “All True?”

About The Author

David Freddoso

Bio:
David Freddoso came to the Washington Examiner in June 2009, after serving for nearly two years as a Capitol Hill-based staff reporter for National Review Online. Before writing his New York Times bestselling book, The Case Against Barack Obama, he spent three years assisting Robert Novak, the legendary Washington... more
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