Landlord to pay $800K for violations 

Supervisor Malia Cohen said tenants endured deplorable conditions such as fallen ceilings, mold infestations, and flooding and human feces flowing up on the grounds. - COURTESY PHOTO
  • Courtesy Photo
  • Supervisor Malia Cohen said tenants endured deplorable conditions such as fallen ceilings, mold infestations, and flooding and human feces flowing up on the grounds.

Officials hope that problem landlords note an $800,000 settlement recently reached with a property owner who amassed numerous building code violations.

Supervisor Malia Cohen, who represents the Bayview, held a news conference Monday afternoon to highlight the neighborhood violations. She said tenants endured deplorable conditions such as fallen ceilings, mold infestations, and flooding and human feces flowing up on the grounds.

“There are dozens of families, children, seniors and individuals that have been subjected to deplorable living conditions for decades,” Cohen said. “Everyone has the right to live in housing that meets basic standards of cleanliness and safety.”

On June 26, City Attorney Dennis Herrera reached a settlement with Bayview Property Managers and property owner James Blanding regarding violations on 18 properties comprising 137 units. The settlement includes a $800,000 payment, correction of all violations by Sept. 15 and a five-year injunction. It is said to be the largest such settlement for violation of city housing codes.

The Department of Building Inspection issued 52 citations, some dating back to 2001, documenting 467 housing code violations and 59 violations relating to water damage, leaks and sewage issues, officials said.

“We are watching and we are taking note, and will come and get those persons who cannot follow the law,” Cohen said.

Blanding and Bayview Property Managers did not return calls seeking comment.

But the case also shows that it can take a considerable amount of time to force some problem property owners to adhere to housing codes.

“It takes a tremendous amount of time to document a series of violations when you have a property owner with multiple properties, multiple violations,” said Rosemary Bosque, the department’s chief housing inspector. “We try to work with the property owners, but it takes some time.”

jsabatini@sfexaminer.com

Pin It
Favorite

Speaking of...

More by Joshua Sabatini

Latest in Government & Politics

© 2018 The San Francisco Examiner

Website powered by Foundation