Krugman: It’s cool to hang Lieberman in effigy but don’t you dare ‘target’ Democratic seats 

The Democratic National Committee emails reporters a lot of stories everyday in an attempt to spin a narrative. The narrative of the week, of course, is the supposedly hateful and violent rhetoric espoused by Obamacare opponents. Paul Krugman’s column today, like most days, can be stitched together from about a dozen DNC emails.

But the most amusing part of Krugman’s column today is his deep concern with the “eliminationist rhetoric” of the GOP:

What has been really striking has been the eliminationist rhetoric of the G.O.P., coming not from some radical fringe but from the party’s leaders. John Boehner, the House minority leader, declared that the passage of health reform was “Armageddon.” The Republican National Committee put out a fund-raising appeal that included a picture of Nancy Pelosi, the speaker of the House, surrounded by flames, while the committee’s chairman declared that it was time to put Ms. Pelosi on “the firing line.” And Sarah Palin put out a map literally putting Democratic lawmakers in the cross hairs of a rifle sight.

All of this goes far beyond politics as usual. Democrats had a lot of harsh things to say about former President George W. Bush — but you’ll search in vain for anything comparably menacing, anything that even hinted at an appeal to violence, from members of Congress, let alone senior party officials.

This is the same Paul Krugman who wrote in December:

“A message to progressives: By all means, hang Senator Joe Lieberman in effigy.”

But heaven forbid Sarah Palin say she wants to “target” certain Democratic seats. For the sake of the republic, we can only hope that John Boehner and those tea party wingnuts refrain from describing election efforts as a “connected series of military operations forming a distinct phase of a war.”

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John McCormack

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