Here's why school choice is the civil rights issue of the future 

It ought to shame a nation to let generation after generation after of its children grow up without learning to read, do essential math, and know the most important highlights of their country's history.

It ought to shame a nation to let generation after generation after of its children grow up without learning to read, do essential math, and know the most important highlights of their country's history.

But that is exactly what America's public schools - controlled by the National Education Association and, to a lesser extent, the American Federation of Teachers - has done. Year after year, anywhere from a third to half of the high school graduates can't read adequately or do basic math operations required to function in a technologically advanced society.

The worst of these schools are the inner city systems where African-American and Hispanic kids are doomed to spend their formative years in places that can literally be lethal for their physical and mental health. And yet the NEA and AFT refuse to give up their monopoly.

Slowly but surely, the public disgust is growing. A new movie is coming this spring that could be the spark that sets off the civil rights movement of the decade, to demand school choice to restore to parents the control over their children's education and to give millions of young Americans a real hope for the future.

Check out the trailer here:

 

Here's the schedule for The Cartel's premiers:

APRIL 16 - The Cartel opens in New York and Los Angeles

APRIL 23 - The Cartel opens in Houston

APRIL 30 - The Cartel opens in Boston, Chicago, Denver, Minneapolis, San Francisco, Washington DC, Philadelphia, and St. Louis

For more information, go here.

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Mark Tapscott

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