Having your snowball and eating it too 

Global warming activists have had a major problem ever since the embarrassing leak of emails from the University of East Anglia’s Climate Research Unit uncovered the shenanigans behind the supposedly “settled science” of global warming.

In March of 2000, CRU’s own Dr. David Viner predicted that winter snowfalls in the United Kingdom would become “a very rare and exciting event .”

Blogging on the popular Watts Up With That? site, Steve Goreham, executive director of the Climate Science Coalition of America, posts a photo taken by NASA’s Terra satellite taken on January 7, 2010 showing the entire British Isles covered in snow

Since Mother Nature hasn’t cooperated with their global warming predictions, and “climate change” is not exactly getting the traction in the media they desire, they’ve come up with a scary new term to explain changes in the weather, Goreham writes:

“Last month, John Holdren, director of the White House’s Office of Science and Technology Policy, urged everyone to start using the term “global climate disruption.” Holdren claimed that the term “global warming” is a “dangerous misnomer” for a complicated problem.

The problem is that Mother Nature refuses to cooperate and run a fever, as Al Gore would say. The beauty of “global climate disruption” is that it’s so generic and ambiguous, cap-and-traders can cite virtually any unpredicted weather pattern as “proof” that humans are causing catastrophic changes to the Earth’s atmosphere.

And, as Goreham points out, climate activists can pick and choose between “global climate disruptions” – depending on whether it supports their theory of man-made global warming or not. So this year’s drought in Russia and massive flooding in Pakistan were cited as evidence of man-made “global climate disruption,” Goreham says, but “record cold temperatures in July in Bolivia, which killed millions of fish in South American rivers, were ignored.”

They’re never wrong!

“Attend almost any lecture today by an advocate of man-made global warming,” Goreham writes, “and you’ll find that ‘heavy snowfall’ is now included on the list of impacts from climate change. Now both heavy snow and lack of snow are evidence of man-made warming.”

That’s called having your snowball and eating it too.

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