Ed Jew: Timeline of an alleged shakedown 

This is a timeline of events in 2007 that led tothe federal charges against Supervisor Ed Jew.

March 14: Jew meets with city planning officials and provides details about the Quickly tapioca chain. A top planning official sends Jew an e-mail saying the chain seems to be in "broad violation" of a formula-retail ordinance.

March 15: A volunteer in Jew’s office speaks with the Irving Street Quickly owner, describes himself as someone with "friends in City Hall" and tells the owner the store is "operating illegally and would be shut down" if not brought into compliance.

March 16: Jew visits the Irving Street Quickly store and leaves his City Hall business card for the owners to contact him.

March 17-18: Jew visits the store again, leaving a handwritten note for the owners. An assistant of the store owner contacts Jew and requests a meeting.

March 19: The store owner and assistant meet Jew in his office, where he shows them the Planning Department e-mail, saying it "indicates the shop was in trouble." Jew tells the owner to pay $10,000 so city officials would "speak favorably on the store’s behalf" and another $10,000 to the "department." Jew says the price would increase to $50,000 if the payment is delayed. Jew tells the owner to deliver the money to his flower shop in Chinatown by 9 a.m. the next day and says he will only accept cash.

March 21: The store owner visits Jew’s flower shop without the money. A consultant arrives, whom Jew claims the $20,000 is for. Jew says the owner "should pay the money as requested, ‘then we’ll talk.’"

March 26: The store owner and store landlord meet with Jew at City Hall, where Jew says all 12 Quickly stores "were in violation." Jew asks that they gather Quickly owners for a meeting tonegotiate a price "for helping with their impending violations."

May 2: The FBI is notified and receives permission to eavesdrop on Jew and the consultant.

May 3: Jew and the consultant meet with the Irving Street store owner, the assistant and the distributor for Quickly in Chinatown, where Jew asks how many other store owners have been recruited. He says it would cost $10,000 per shop if the seven or eight other owners were recruited.

May 4: Jew meets the Quickly distributor and two informants posing as store owners at his flower shop, where they tell him that eight store owners have agreed to pay $10,000 each. Jew tells them that the consultant would take the money and help the store owners fill out appropriate permits. Jew assures them of his power by making a schematic drawing that shows the mayor at the top, then the supervisors, then the city department heads.

May 7: The Irving Street store owner, assistant and two informants meet Jew in his flower shop, where they give him $40,000 in FBI marked $100 bills. Jew counts the money, bill by bill.

May 9: The consultant delivers an invoice to an informant, stating that the "balance due" is $5,000.

May 10: The informant telephones the consultant to inquire about the "balance due." The consultant says Jew told him that the fee for each store was $15,000.

May 18: The FBI interviews Jew at his flower shop, where he tells them the Irving Street store assistant and landlord came to him of their own volition. He tells the FBI "they asked for help," but that he referred them to the consultant. Jew also tells the FBI that at the consultant’s directive, he met with the store owners and accepted $40,000 on his behalf. He says he gave the $40,000 to the consultant and that he did not keep any money. After learning some of the conversations were recorded, Jew admits to keeping $20,000.

May 18: The FBI searches Jew’s Burlingame residence and finds $10,000 of the marked $100 bills.

Source: U.S. Attorney’s Criminal Complaint filed on Sept. 20 


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