Atty. Gen. Conway’s brother lied to Louisville police, got off easy 

Which story do you suppose is more relevant — Aquabuddha, or this one?

Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway’s brother, Matthew, was a prosecutor in Louisville. The cops in Louisville were secretly investigating Matt Conway for “drug use or trafficking.” But a friendly detectives tipped him off twice to two separate drug investigations. Matt Conway learned from one of the tipsters that his house was going to be searched any day. The search happened two days later, and (of course) nothing way found.

The cops figured out that there had been leaks, and they called in Matt Conway, who  lied to investigators and said he had not been tipped off. Four days later, Matt went back and changed his story, after learning that another witness had actually told them the truth. And — surprise, surprise — the attorney general’s brother got off easy.

David Harris, a professor of law at the University of Pittsburgh who writes and teaches about police behavior and law enforcement, said [that prosecutor David] Stengel let Conway off too easily.

“To admit you lied in an investigation where you were the subject, and it involved law-enforcement conduct, I find that very troubling,” Harris said, adding that he found it “mysterious that this wouldn’t trouble” Stengel.

Lewis Katz, a professor at Case Western Reserve University School of Law, and a criminal-justice authority, agreed. Katz also said Conway’s false statements to investigators “absolutely” have impugned his integrity and, therefore, his ability to represent the state in court. “He is hopelessly compromised,” Katz said.

Matt Conway is still an assistant Commonwealth Attorney, despite his misconduct.

There’s another tidbit involving Jack Conway himself. In March (apparently March of this year, although it’s not clear), one of Jack’s supporters overheard a different detective in a restaurant discussing the investigation into Matt Conway. Word got back to his brother Jack, the Senate candidate. Jack and Matt immediately went to see a lawyer together.

About The Author

David Freddoso

Bio:
David Freddoso came to the Washington Examiner in June 2009, after serving for nearly two years as a Capitol Hill-based staff reporter for National Review Online. Before writing his New York Times bestselling book, The Case Against Barack Obama, he spent three years assisting Robert Novak, the legendary Washington... more
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