Water-supply plant to settle outside Golden Gate Park 

click to enlarge A recycled-water treatment facility is now planned for the Oceanside Wastewater Treatment Plant and a portion of the nearby California Army National Guard Armory property instead of Golden Gate Park. - GETTY IMAGES
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  • A recycled-water treatment facility is now planned for the Oceanside Wastewater Treatment Plant and a portion of the nearby California Army National Guard Armory property instead of Golden Gate Park.

San Francisco’s beloved Golden Gate Park is no longer in the running to house a recycled-water treatment facility.

The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission and the Recreation and Park Department announced Wednesday the facility is now planned for the Oceanside Wastewater Treatment Plant and a portion of the nearby California Army National Guard Armory property.

A plan to locate the treatment facility in Golden Gate Park was opposed by park advocates with strong feelings about keeping the land undeveloped.

The proposed treatment plant, part of what is known as the Westside Recycled Water Project, would provide 2 million gallons per day of treated water for nonpotable purposes, such as irrigation or toilet flushing. It would serve large-agency customers on the west side of San Francisco, including Golden Gate Park, the Lincoln Park and Presidio golf courses, and the California Academy of Sciences.

“We are thankful the SFPUC was able to identify a new potential site for this critical water-supply project,” said Phil Ginsburg, general manager for the Recreation and Park Department. “It is important to know the concerns of our park advocates were heard and addressed.”

The SFPUC plans to present details of the revised proposal in the coming months and negotiate use of the area owned by the armory. Ed Harrington, the agency’s general manager, said the planned treatment facility is vital to the department’s future.

“Diversifying our local water sources with recycled water is a critical part of our long-term water-supply plan,” Harrington said. He also said that the new location is expected to work out.

“The challenge for this project was choosing a treatment location that was acceptable not only from a feasibility standpoint, but also from the viewpoint of local stakeholders,” he said. “This solution accomplishes both of these goals.”

jsabatini@sfexaminer.com

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