SF teen charged with burglarizing home of golf course architect Robert Trent Jones Jr. 

click to enlarge A San Francisco teenager reportedly had no idea he was burglarizing the Woodside home of legendary golf course architect Robert Trent Jones Jr. (pictured) in March. - SCREENSHOT VIA YOUTUBE USER FAIRWAYGREENS
  • screenshot via YouTube user FairwayGreens
  • A San Francisco teenager reportedly had no idea he was burglarizing the Woodside home of legendary golf course architect Robert Trent Jones Jr. (pictured) in March.

This young burglar landed in the rough.

A San Francisco teenager pleaded no contest Tuesday to felony residential burglary after breaking into the Woodside home of famous golf course architect Robert Trent "Bobby" Jones Jr. this year.

Julio Cesar Jimenez-Hernandez, who committed the burglary only a month after his 18th birthday and had been in custody since the March 15 heist, was sentenced to 176 days in County Jail and three years' probation. However, he was released Tuesday after receiving credit for time served, San Mateo County District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe said.

Jimenez-Hernandez made off with a $15,000 Rolex watch and a silver 1984 U.S. Olympic commemorative coin from Jones' Churchill Avenue home, according to prosecutors.

He was detained the morning after the burglary, prosecutors said, when police in Brisbane reportedly saw him casing businesses.

"The officers noted the defendant had a bulge protruding from the front of the hoodie he was wearing," Wagstaffe said.

After a search, he was found in possession of the gold Rolex engraved with Jones' name along with the Olympic coin, Wagstaffe said.

Authorities say the teen did not know whom he had robbed.

Jones and his Palo Alto-based company, Robert Trent Jones II LLC, have designed or remodeled hundreds of golf courses worldwide. A request for comment from Jones wasn't returned Tuesday.

Jones was also a member of the California Park and Recreation Commission from 1979-83 and president of the American Society of Golf Course Architects from 1989-90.

His father, Robert Trent Jones, created or redesigned about 500 courses before he died in 2000.

Jimenez-Hernandez said he committed the burglary because he was "short on money," Wagstaffe said.

His attorney, Jeff Hayden, described Jimenez-Hernandez as "very remorseful."

"This is a young kid who stumbled into the wrong place," said Hayden, adding Jimenez-Hernandez was "very cooperative" with police.

Wagstaffe said Jimenez-Hernandez received a relatively light sentence because he had no prior record, but he now has a felony strike.

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