Selig proud of baseball's anti-drug effort 

click to enlarge Since the drug-testing program started in 2004 under Bud Selig, 32 major-league players have been suspended. - MICHAEL LOCCISANO/GETTY IMAGES FILE PHOTO
  • Michael Loccisano/Getty Images file photo
  • Since the drug-testing program started in 2004 under Bud Selig, 32 major-league players have been suspended.

MILWAUKEE — Commissioner Bud Selig defended baseball's fight against performance-enhancing drugs on Wednesday, declining to discuss the recent suspension of Brewers outfielder Ryan Braun or whether other stars will also face penalties.

Braun was suspended for the rest of the season Monday, a total of 65 games, for violating baseball's anti-drug policy. He is the first player to be punished as part of an investigation of the now-closed Biogenesis Clinic, which is believed to have provided performance-enhancing drugs to as many as 20 other players; a list that is believed to include injured New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez.

Selig said he could not discuss the ongoing investigation.

"Any comment from me is inappropriate," Selig said. "People have been thorough. I said last week the process would be comprehensive, thorough, fair and we have spent thousands of hours doing these things. I appreciate all the players who have been complimentary of the process. We're doing this in a very a disciplined, thorough, fair and sensitive matter."

Selig said he was proud of baseball's drug testing program. Since the program was first implemented in 2004, 32 major league players have been suspended for using banned substances. Three were suspended a second time.

In addition, 47 minor league players or players formerly in the major leagues have been suspended, including six repeat offenders.

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