Planning Commission has lost common sense 

The Planning Commission that oversees private development in The City continues to operate independently of all common sense. In a recent meeting on a project to build small affordable condos, they again postponed a decision — adding another six months to the process — seemingly based on personal grudges over a draft code complaint.

Time is money, especially in San Francisco.

The commission then added demands and more requirements not code-required. In a dispute over the existing building parking, the commissioners recommended it be eliminated (unbelievable) to enhance an already compliant design.

This is not an isolated case. The San Francisco Planning Commission is anti-growth and anti-jobs. It would be appropriate if all the commissioners were fired.

R.E. O’Leary, San Francisco

Ship game too wasteful

The Obama administration flew two college basketball teams from Michigan and North Carolina to San Diego, and from there to an offshore aircraft carrier to play a Veterans Day basketball game on the flight deck in front of Barack and Michelle Obama.

I am appalled at the expense, but, even worse, at the example of what this administration will do to try to appear pro-America, or pro-sports, or pro-NASCAR to win a vote for 2012.

Cary Fulbright, San Francisco

Keep the big banks happy

Thank you for perfectly presenting the warped mentality dominating our Beltway politics: It’s vitally important that we give the big banks everything they want, because if we don’t, they’ll only turn around and punish millions of consumers with crushing fees.

It’s not as if the banks would ever raise fees or lay off workers without Congress being mean to them. Is it?

Brian McCall, San Francisco

Welfare is only OK for rich

Remember the apocryphal “Welfare Cadillac”? That was the rhetorical device conservatives used to illustrate how society’s poorest and weakest elements were getting away with something at the expense of working Americans.

Well, today it’s back, this time as a “Welfare Mercedes.” The key difference is that this time it’s society’s wealthiest and most powerful elements that are getting away with something at the expense of Americans — but not necessarily working Americans, because so many Americans are no longer working.

Note, too, that unlike the Welfare Cadillac, references to the Welfare Mercedes are decried as evidence of envy or “class warfare.”

Evidently, when the wealthy receive government assistance it’s a legitimate extension of free-market capitalism; when the poor receive help, it is evidence of socialism or even communism.

Riley B. VanDyke, San Francisco

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