More education needed for ranked-choice voting 

Ranked-choice voting has obvious advantages over a run-off system — cheaper, faster, offering opportunity to lesser-known candidates, ensuring greater voter turn-out than run-offs and requiring fewer of our political campaign dollars.

The problem seems to be that voters are not using it properly because they fail to understand the effective strategy for ranking their top three choices. Focusing on greater voter education would correct this.

Another improvement would also greatly increase voter turnout and reduce election costs: San Francisco should adopt mail-in-only balloting. It is constitutional, it is easy and it makes perfect sense (until online voting becomes a reality).

Jason Jungreis, San Francisco

 

Rules for BART operators

I catch the 6:27 a.m. SFO BART train every weekday morning for my commute from Concord. There are always several off-duty train operators riding in the first car to be let off the train when it makes a special stop for them at the BART yard just outside Concord (another bone of contention with me).

I was listening to them complaining about passengers who contact them to complain when someone is playing their music too loud on the train. They seemed completely mystified as to why the passengers are calling them. They literally said "What exactly did they expect us to do about it?"

Hello? Why don’t the operators call ahead to have BART police waiting a couple of stations down the line to escort the offender off? If there are rules about loud music, let’s enforce them.

Jeff Rabb, Concord

 

Real pension reform

The passage of the Proposition C pension reform plan will hardly cause a ripple to the take-home pay of police officers, firefighters and city officials.

A better idea would be to slash and cap salaries of the highest-paid personnel to $100,000 a year with an accompanying reduction in pension.

City jobs should not be used as a cash cow, and the majority of lower-paid city workers should not be burdened for financial woes they did not cause.

Denise D’Anne, San Francisco

 

No privacy for voters

I voted Tuesday, and now I know the political affiliations and phone numbers of everybody in my building.

I got that information from the list that hangs on the front door of every polling place. I can also get addresses, phone numbers and political affiliations for my entire neighborhood.

It is so nice to live in a country where my vote is my own secret.

Gerald Manders, San Francisco

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