‘Easy Chinese’ comes to San Francisco 

click to enlarge Great ingredients: Ching-He Huang appears in “Easy Chinese: San Francisco,” which debuts at 10 a.m. Saturday on the Cooking Channel. (Courtesy photo) - GREAT INGREDIENTS: CHING-HE HUANG APPEARS IN “EASY CHINESE: SAN FRANCISCO,” WHICH DEBUTS AT 10 A.M. SATURDAY ON THE COOKING CHANNEL. (COURTESY PHOTO)
  • Great ingredients: Ching-He Huang appears in “Easy Chinese: San Francisco,” which debuts at 10 a.m. Saturday on the Cooking Channel. (Courtesy photo)
  • Great ingredients: Ching-He Huang appears in “Easy Chinese: San Francisco,” which debuts at 10 a.m. Saturday on the Cooking Channel. (Courtesy photo)

Debuting at 10 a.m. Saturday on the Cooking Channel is “Easy Chinese: San Francisco” featuring popular foodie Ching-He Huang, best known for the “Chinese Food Made Easy” series.

The City is featured prominently in the new show, which highlights the distinctly original vibe of the Bay Area — everything from Chinatown’s vibrant and hidden culinary gems to home-cooked Chinese meals with original flair.

“We’re basically using the best of the Bay Area produce and more,” Huang said on a recent trip to shoot the episodes. “You guys have it great. I’ve met a lot of great people and we’ve shared knowledge. And that’s what the show is about — people and The City and what it has to offer.”

Going from outdoor markets and traditional noodle houses to the Mission district, Huang can be seen on the hunt for the freshest ingredients she can find. How-to tips are tossed in the mix, along with Huang’s modern-day twist on meal preparation.

In the premiere, Huang ventures into San Francisco’s Wok Shop in Chinatown, where she shares a meal with owner Tane Chan and explores essential sauces, oils and the “holy trinity” of Chinese spices — chili, ginger and garlic.

A jaunt to Berkeley Bowl, where she picks up ingredients for Three Cup Chicken, Vegetable Lettuce Wraps and Yangzhou Fried Rice, is also on the agenda.

Other excursions include the Ferry Plaza Market, San Dong Noodle House, Monterey Abalone Farm, Great Eastern Dim Sum House and the Palace of Fine Arts.

For Huang, novelty is what she likes best about working with food: “It’s that every dish will be different; it’s like wine and the grapes. Every dish that you create is going to be different depending on where you got the food from — how something was grown, the climate or the animal and how it was raised ... the unexpectedness of it and what you are going to get, and how it is going to taste — that’s what I love the most.”

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Greg Archer

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