Busting falsehoods about ‘fiscal cliff’ 

Top five “fiscal cliff” myths:

  1. That a fiscal cliff of some sort really exists. In fact, there is no reason for the cuts and cutbacks, as this matter is entirely self-imposed and unrelated to any actual events.
  2. We are taking on costly increased debt. In fact, we are making money selling our debt and making net money selling our Treasury notes (they are bought at a loss due to their stability).
  3. Taxes are high. In fact, overall taxes for the wealthy are the lowest they’ve been for more than 50 years.
  4. Taxes will be increasing. In fact, the only occurrence will be the end of tax cuts  —  taxes will revert to the rate intended when the cuts were initiated.
  5. Taxes on the wealthy hurt job growth. In fact, economic stability leads to investment and growth, and every credible study has found that there is no correlation between tax cuts for the wealthy and increased job growth.

I believe the fiscal cliff issue hinges upon a perception that the Republicans are economic hawks; in fact, Republicans are dramatically more responsible for our national debt.

A last nugget: we have to date spent $2.3 trillion on the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, fully 15 percent of the national deficit. Wow.

Jason Jungreis
San Francisco

Pair presumed innocent

Dan Schreiber’s article raises important issues about privacy and social media, but it descends into sensationalism by repeating the unsubstantiated narrative of the Police Department.

It is ironic that in an article about efforts to protect our right to privacy, The San Francisco Examiner blasts pictures of Robert Donohoe and Lauren Smith on its front page. Mind you, they have not been convicted of any charges, and yet it seems like the police and district attorney are using your publication as their own courtroom.

Why pander to institutions that desire and wield unlimited power yet clearly have nothing but a political vendetta against these activists?

Tony Marks-Block
San Francisco

Dropping the (Sno) Ball

Gone and forgotten.

Long before the demise of the Twinkie, another sugary delight disappeared from grocery and convenience store shelves.

A pink marshmallow covered with coconut on a chocolate cookie, called a Sno Ball.  There were no cries of, “Save the Sno Ball!” only silence.

Sno Ball fans like me feel somehow cheated. One can only wonder how the Ding Dong and Ho Ho fans must feel.

Keith C. De Filippis
San Jose

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