80 percent of San Francisco schools fail to meet No Child Left Behind goals 

click to enlarge Eighty percent of San Francisco public schools failed to make adequate yearly progress as defined by the federal No Child Left Behind law, the California Department of Education announced Wednesday. (AP file photo) - EIGHTY PERCENT OF SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS FAILED TO MAKE ADEQUATE YEARLY PROGRESS AS DEFINED BY THE FEDERAL NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND LAW, THE CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ANNOUNCED WEDNESDAY. (AP FILE PHOTO)
  • Eighty percent of San Francisco public schools failed to make adequate yearly progress as defined by the federal No Child Left Behind law, the California Department of Education announced Wednesday. (AP file photo)
  • Eighty percent of San Francisco public schools failed to make adequate yearly progress as defined by the federal No Child Left Behind law, the California Department of Education announced Wednesday. (AP file photo)

Eighty percent of San Francisco public schools failed to make adequate yearly progress as defined by the federal No Child Left Behind law, the California Department of Education announced Wednesday.

The district as a whole also did not meet targets for students passing math and English tests, though it did meet a target for graduation, with 86 percent of students leaving high school with a diploma.

Though most San Francisco schools did not meet federal requirements, the district did gain five points on California’s own Academic Performance Index, or API, earning a score of 796. That is just four points shy of the state’s target.

Statewide, only 35 percent of elementary schools, 18 percent of middle schools and 41 percent of high schools met No Child Left Behind target, a decline of 5 percentage points for elementaries, 8 points for middle schools and 1 point for high schools.

Both the API and No Child Left Behind progress are based on the state’s Standardized Testing and Reporting exams and the California High School Exit Examination.

The number of students passing these tests has increased every year for the past decade, but rising federal targets have outpaced California’s students. Targets for math and reading proficiency rose 11 percentage points this year, to 67 percent. In 2014 the targets will rise to 100 percent, a goal most educators say will be impossible to meet.

Last week, state schools chief Tom Torlakson called on the federal government to grant the state a waiver from some No Child Left Behind requirements. Without a waiver, California school districts will be required to sanction schools that did not make progress. Sanctions could include such dire measures as replacing faculty or closing campuses.

acrawford@sfexaminer.com

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